Politics, Business & Culture in the Americas

From the Think Tanks



SEDEREC

Mexico City has seen a surge of external and internal migration since the late 1990s. In the report, Ley y reglamento de interculturalidad, atención a migrantes y movilidad humana en el Distrito Federal: Reflexiones, SEDEREC sums up the proposals made by the public and private sectors to the Mexican government over the past 15 years to implement a human rights-based policy on migration and multiculturalism. According to the report, xenophobic and discriminatory policies have affected immigrants’ ability to move and integrate. The SEDEREC report highlights the value of preserving Indigenous traditions and is available in Náhuatl as well as Spanish, English and French.

Committee to Protect Journalists

Journalists and transparency advocates are concerned by the White House’s efforts to control information disclosure and scrutinize the press. In its report, The Obama Administration and the Press: Leak investigations and surveillance in post-9/11 America, the Committee to Protect Journalists examines how the U.S. government has stepped up its investigation and surveillance of media sources and journalists, and limited access to government information. It documents the cases of whistleblowers since 2009 who have faced felony criminal prosecutions under the 1917 Espionage Act. The report calls on the Obama administration to honor its promise of a transparent administration and accountable government.

Plataforma Democratica

Brazil’s relations with other countries in South America have grown and diversified in recent years. Resources on the Internet: Brazil–South America Relations: Infrastructure, Energy Integration, Security and Defense, published by Plataforma Democrática, has compiled Internet resources and tools to facilitate research on infrastructure, energy integration, security, and defense relations in the region. The report provides a thorough list of online academic papers in Spanish, English, Portuguese, and French, in addition to websites, blogs, and social networks studying Brazil’s relations with the rest of South America.

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