Politics, Business & Culture in the Americas
A country-by-country look at the region’s long history of involuntary presidential departures.

President No Longer

by Brendan O’Boyle

WHEN BRAZIL’S DILMA ROUSSEFF WAS IMPEACHED IN 2016, it was the latest example of how Latin American presidents don’t always finish their terms. A recent academic study compiled so-called involuntary departures across the region since 1900, and found they are becoming more common again. Of the 12 impeachments or “declarations of incapacity” in Latin America since 1900, 10 have occurred in the past 30 years. Six occurred in just three countries — Brazil, Ecuador and Paraguay. 20 countries compared by number of involuntary presidential exits
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source: Aníbal Pérez-Liñán and John Polga-Hecimovich. “Explaining military coups and impeachments in Latin America.” Democratization 24, no. 5.  notes: Impeachment includes declarations of incapacity. Revolution includes civilian revolts. Photo Credits: agência brasil: ecu: a. milena; bra: m. camargo; un photo: bol: e. debebe; par: r. bajornas; gua: e. schneider; hon & ven: m. castro; wikimedia: hai; sgt: v. gempis/usaf; arg: d. zanini; pan; per: gobierno peruano; dom: fotograaf onbekend/anefo; nic, cub & mex: underwood & underwood; slv: brigadier044; cri: gomez-miralles; uru; getty: chi: s. visalli; col: r. scherschel/life
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