Politics, Business & Culture in the Americas

Web Exclusive

Bilbao-Picture-510x340
U.S. Foreign Policy Should Not be Controlled by the Cuban Government

YES. Should some elements of U.S. policy still be changed irrespective of what the Cuban government does in the short term? After 50 years, the all-or-nothing approach of U.S. policy toward Cuba has undoubtedly yielded nothing. Defenders of maintaining this status quo have suggested that any changes in U.S. policy would represent “concessions” to the … Read more

Web Exclusive

Orlando Cuba Photo
Concessions to the Cubans would Embolden the Regime

NO. Should some elements of U.S. policy still be changed irrespective of what the Cuban government does in the short term? We shouldn’t make unilateral concessions to the Castro regime because it will cost lives. Fundamentally fragile, totalitarian dictatorships interpret all policy actions through the narrow lens of regime survival. That means they unfailingly construe … Read more

Web Exclusive

Citizen Fear of Terrorism in the Americas

Increased sophistication, scope, and fatalities define modern terrorism and leave few corners of the globe immune from its threat. Terrorism (destructive attacks against non-military targets typically for political purposes) has had a greater presence in some countries in the Americas, such as Colombia and Peru, but terrorist acts have been recorded elsewhere in recent years … Read more

Web Exclusive

The Honduran Catharsis

An AmericasBarometer Insights Series Report1

Web Exclusive

corrales_ph2
Six Reasons Why Argentina Legalized Gay Marriage First

Javier Corrales also wrote for AQ Online in March on Latin American Gays: The Post-Left Leftists, examining the innovative and successful political strategies—in action and thinking—adopted by LGBT groups in Latin America in the last decade. —AQ This month, Argentina changed its civil code to permit gay marriage and adoptions, becoming the first nation in … Read more

Web Exclusive

hrinak_ph
The Next Health Challenge in the Hemisphere: Non-Communicable Diseases

This year in the Americas, 4.5 million people will die of chronic, non-communicable diseases (NCDs) such as heart disease, cancer, hypertension, diabetes, and obesity.  While the countries of the region have made great strides over the past two generations in decreasing death rates from infectious diseases—they are no longer the leading causes of death in … Read more

Web Exclusive

cordova01
Haitians Need their Own Voice

Six months after the earthquake, Haiti’s situation has barely improved. Rubble still clutters the streets of Port-au-Prince; over a million residents remain homeless and without access to basic services; and only 28,000 semi-permanent shelters have been built. Despite the slow recovery, United Nations officials are also quick to add that “what hasn’t happened is worth … Read more

Web Exclusive

Eternal Spring, Eternal Tyranny: A Photographic Essay

“En 1800, un visitante europeo llamó a Guatemala Tierra de la Eterna Primavera. Un siglo después, el político y ensayista guatemalteco Manuel Galich llamó a su país Tierra de la Eterna Tiranía. Para pocos, Guatemala es un paraíso. Para muchos, es todo lo contrario.” For the few, Guatemala is a paradise. For the many, it … Read more

Web Exclusive

Latin America’s Support for Same-Sex Marriage

Argentina is the region’s first country to legalize gay marriage, but tolerance is not as high across countries. Here’s why. Joining South Africa, Canada and seven European countries, Argentina has now extended the full rights of marriage to gays and lesbians nationwide. The law, signed by President Cristina Fernández de Kirchner on July 21, 2010, means … Read more

Web Exclusive

The Other Side of Cuba’s Prisoner Release

The announcement by Havana that it would release five political prisoners “who would travel to Spain with their families,” and another 47 during the next three or four months, has been credited to efforts by Spanish Foreign Minister Miguel Ángel Moratinos and Cuba’s archbishop, Cardinal Jaime Ortega. But neither Cardinal Ortega, nor Minister Moratinos would … Read more

Web Exclusive

Danger in Guatemala

The battle to regain control of Guatemala’s institutions from deeply entrenched criminal interests has reached an alarming new juncture.  Two weeks ago, the head of the International Commission against Impunity in Guatemala (CICIG), a UN-led commission to investigate and prosecute high-profile organized crime and corruption, resigned in frustration. Since January 2008, the CICIG has made … Read more

Web Exclusive

The Path Ahead for Colombia’s President-Elect

Even before he starts his presidential term in August, Colombia’s president-elect, Juan Manuel Santos, has already broken records. A scion of Colombia’s establishment, Santos pulled in just over 9 million votes, winning 69 percent of the vote against the 27 percent secured by his rival, Antanus Mockus. Santos’ victory is the highest percentage of votes … Read more

Web Exclusive

StateDept_HillaryCorrea- full
Hillary Clinton’s Quito Address: Now Comes the Hard Part

Hillary Clinton responded to the drumbeat of demands for a major administration policy speech on Latin America this week during her stopover in Quito, Ecuador. The U.S. secretary of state was working her way back home—due to also visit Colombia and Barbados—after attending the annual Organization of American States (OAS) General Assembly in Lima, Peru. … Read more

Web Exclusive

Escaping Juarez: A Photographic Essay

Once the crown jewel of the maquila miracle that was going to be the cornerstone of Mexico’s development, Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua is being abandoned these days by those who were lured there with promises of decent, well-paid jobs. The city’s fate is now in the hands of rival drug gangs who operate with absolute impunity … Read more

Web Exclusive

full-alt
Lobo Reverses Stance on Honduran Coup

Last week, Honduran President Porfirio Lobo Sosa publicly acknowledged that the expulsion of President Manuel Zelaya from the country on June 28, 2009, constituted a coup. This was a startling admission from a man who won last year’s presidential election in a climate rife with fear, repression and censorship. Lobo’s belated recognition of the coup … Read more

Sign up for our free newsletter