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Peru

Christiana Figueres, secretary general of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, said that global emissions should peak in the next few years.

This week's likely top stories: Global leaders gather in Lima for the COP20 Climate Summit; Tabaré Vázquez wins the runoff presidential election in Uruguay; With FARC hostages released, Colombian peace talks are set to resume in Havana; Venezuela braces for impact as oil prices hit rock bottom; Cuba misses the mark on economic growth in 2014.

The leaders of Chile, Peru and Mexico used their time in Beijing to push for greater Chinese investment back home.

This week’s likely top stories: Dilma Rousseff and Aécio Neves head to a runoff election; U.S. Supreme Court rejects same-sex marriage appeals; domestic renewable energy market opens in Chile; Mexican college students may be buried in mass graves; Peruvian elections are marred by violence; Catamarca creates a new mining district.

This week’s likely top stories: Canadian businessman Cy Tokmakjian is sentenced to 15 years in Cuba; Mexico searches for 58 missing students; Venezuela’s bolivar hits a new low; Peru arrests two suspects in the murder of Indigenous activists; Colombian peace negotiator Humberto de la Calle says his e-mail was hacked.

Peru has become one of the most important culinary destinations in the world. How did chef Gaston Acurio help launch this culinary awakening?

Following a week of debate, Peru’s Congress approved President Ollanta Humala’s new 20-person cabinet yesterday, which will be led by Prime Minister Ana Jara.

From the age of 10, Marina Silva would wake up before dawn to prepare food for her father, so that he could set off through the dense jungle before the heat of the tropical sun made it impossible for him to keep working. In Silva’s community of rubber tappers in Brazil’s northwestern state of Acre, survival depended on the collection of natural latex that bleeds like sap from the Amazon’s seringueira tree.

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