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Guatemala
The Guatemalan state has failed in its obligations to consult Indigenous peoples.

On Tuesday former Guatemalan President Alfonso Portillo plead guilty to a money-laundering case in New York City federal court and will be sentenced to four to six years in federal prison on June 23.

A trial against former guerrilla leader Fermín Felipe Solano Barrillas of the Organización del Pueblo en Armas (Revolutionary Organization of Armed People—ORPA) began on Thursday for the massacre of 22 farmers in the town of El Aguacate, Chimaltenango, in 1998.

The likelihood is that Guatemala’s next attorney general will be a less dynamic, less controversial pick than the 2013 Nobel Peace Prize candidate and Forbes nominee of one of six women changing the world, Claudia Paz y Paz.

Likely top stories this week: Self-defense forces take over in Apatzingan, Michoacán; currency controls threaten Venezuelan newspapers; stadium construction workers may go on strike in Manaus; Obama's pending decision on the Keystone Pipeline; nine people are killed in Petén, Guatemala.

Across Latin America, military-led anticrime strategies are losing ground to newer concepts such as community policing.

Guatemala has captured the attention of media and policymakers across the globe with historic proceedings against former leaders, discussions on drug decriminalization, its U.N. Security Council and OAS involvement, organized crime, and other hot topics.

Last week, Guatemala’s Court of High Risk “B” (Tribunal de Mayor Riesgo “B”) announced that the genocide trial of Guatemala’s former president, General Efraín Ríos Montt,  will not resume until January 2015.

When masked men burst into the tiny hamlet of San José Nacahuil on a peaceful Sunday evening last month, what followed was all too familiar to Guatemalans.

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