aqlogo_white X
Politics, Business & Culture in the Americas
Countries   |   About    |   Subscribe   |   Newsletter
aqlogo_white

aqlogo_white
aqlogo_white
Canada

The results are in and the United Kingdom “no’s” have won a modest, but decisive victory in the referendum on Scotland’s independence.

With only a few days left for Scottish voters to decide about their future in or out of the United Kingdom, the international media hype around Scotland’s September 18 referendum on independence has intensified.

Yesterday, Canada’s Transportation Safety Board (TSB) concluded their investigation of the Lac-Mégantic, Quebec train derailment that occurred on July 5, 2013.

Quebec will likely be a determining factor in who will govern Canada after the next election—for the first time in more than two decades.

After a long and dreary winter and an unusually rainy spring, Montrealers have greeted the summer season with the Canadian Grand Prix, a series of elaborate street festivals including Jazz Fest and Just for Laughs, and the traditional national holidays of Québec and Canada.  They are part of the usual rituals of summer associated with Montreal.

It is fair to say that Putin has probably been the most dominant newsmaker in the world in the past year.  Even his threat to invade the Ukraine continues to be part of the news cycle as the U.S. and Iran grapple with a terrorist insurgence in Iraq. No one should doubt Putin’s skills in the world of realpolitik, but should instead question the lack of media scrutiny behind the skills and his ultimate aims.

The Conference of Montreal’s theme this year focused on dealing with what organizers call the “next era of growth.” With the Great Recession behind us, there remain concerns about whether the right conditions exist for sustained global growth. It is clear that the financial crisis of 2008-2009 left its scars, and growth patterns remain inconsistent in both developed and emerging economies.

The PQ and the independence movement must come to grips with the fact that the Québec of today has changed from the early days of the independence movement in the 1960s and 1970s. 

After just 18 months at the head of a minority government, Québec Premier Pauline Marois went down to a stunning defeat in Québec's April 7 elections.

Pages